Getting it for Free: When Foundations Provide the News on Health

A paper by Maralee Schwartz, spring 2009 fellow, analyzes the implications of using health news provided by non-profit organizations. Departure of experienced journalists and shrinking budgets for reporting have resulted in a decline in the variety of content newspapers produce…

How Much Would You Pay to Save the Planet? The American Press and the Economics of Climate Change

A paper by Eric Pooley, fall 2008 fellow, examines how the media has covered the economics of climate change. This paper follows coverage of the economic debate over Senate Bill 2191, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2008, which called…

Journalism and Global Health

A paper by Philip J. Hilts, spring 2008 fellow, explores the growth and future of global health news coverage. Hilts found that although newspapers have suffered an overall decline in reporting, global health coverage of topics such as new diseases, the…

Covering Controversial Science: Improving Reporting on Science and Public Policy

A paper by Cristine Russell, spring 2006 fellow, surveys the state of science journalism, and finds that as the pace of new developments in science and technology quickens, journalists are increasingly confronted with covering complicated technical information as well as…

Framing Obesity: The Evolution of News Discourse on a Public Health Issue

A paper by Regina G. Lawrence, fall 2003 fellow, assesses the framing of obesity in news coverage since 1985 to determine whether obesity is being reframed as a systemic problem, rather than a personal one. The data suggest that a…

From Bhopal to Superfund: The News Media and the Environment

A paper by Sanjoy Hazarika, fall 1993 fellow, analyzes the press coverage of India’s Bhopal disaster in 1984. Hazarika was one of the first reporters to cover the industrial accident, a gas leak from a pesticide plant that killed more…

Notes for the Next Epidemic, Part One: Lessons from News Coverage of AIDS

A paper by Timothy Cook, fall 1988 fellow, evaluates press coverage of the AIDS epidemic, and argues that many standard journalistic practices contributed to poor coverage of the issue, and may have led to slow policy responses. Cook cites several…

Tritium and the Times: How the Nuclear Weapons-Production Scandal Became a National Story

A paper by William Lanouette, spring-fall 1988 fellow, provides a case study on the role of the press in nuclear weapons policy. For more than a decade, pieces of a nationwide scandal had surfaced from the vast and sprawling system…