While America Slept: Coverage of Terrorism from 1993 to September 11, 2001

A paper by Matthew V. Storin, spring 2002 fellow, considers whether American news outlets utterly failed to prepare the public for the trauma of 9/11, or raised at least some flags of caution. The research spans an eight-and-a-half-year period from…

Covering September 11 and Its Consequences: A Comparative Study of the Press in America, India and Pakistan

A paper by Ramindar Singh, fall 2001 fellow, analyzes how the press in the U.S. responded to the need to understand and report on the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and how the press in India and Pakistan handled…

A Hierarchy of Innocence: The Media’s Use of Children in the Telling of International News

A paper by Susan D. Moeller, spring 2000 fellow, examines the media’s use of imagery of children in news stories about conflict. Moeller argues that the shift in warfare and in geopolitics since the Cold War has made it difficult…

The Race Issue in Australia’s 2001 Election: A Creation of Politicians or the Press?

A paper by Paul Kelly, spring 2002 fellow, tells the story of the Tampa, of Australia’s new and punitive refugee policy in 2001, of the reaction and role of the country’s leading newspapers to this event, and their complex connections….

The War on Terrorism Goes Online: Media and Government Response to First Post-Internet Crisis

A paper by Andrew J. Glass, fall 2001 fellow, investigates the multifaceted role that the Internet played in the initial phases of the campaign against global terrorist networks. While the parameters of today’s online communications’ systems were in place during…

The Global News Networks and U.S. Policymaking in Defense and Foreign Affairs

A paper by Eytan Gilboa, spring 2002 fellow, investigates the effects of global television news on the formulation and implementation of foreign policy. While it found no evidence to support the “CNN effect,” a theory that claims global television now…

Age in the Press

A paper by Hans Bergstrom, spring 2001 fellow, asks whether, in the face of an aging population, the print media is taking due notice? An aging society, and the issues that such a changing society brings, should affect the press…

The Form of Reports on U.S. Newspaper Internet Sites

A paper by Kevin G. Barnhurst, fall 2001 fellow, argues that U.S. newspapers that publish electronic editions on the Internet do not appear to reinvent themselves online. Instead the Web versions reproduce the substance of their print editions in a…

The Content of Reports on U.S. Newspaper Internet Sites

A paper by Kevin G. Barnhurst, fall 2001 fellow, argues that moving newspaper content onto the Internet has not, in itself, changed what journalists write. In many ways, the who, what, when, where, why, and how of news stories continue…

The American Media and Race Relations in an Interdependent World: A Report on the Shorenstein Center Conference on Race and the Press

On June 28, 2001, the Shorenstein Center sponsored a conference in Washington, DC on race and the press. The objective of the conference was to examine the complicated entwining of race and media from both local and national perspectives. Former…