Junk News: Can Public Broadcasters Buck the Tabloid Tendencies of Market-Driven Journalism? A Canadian Experience

A paper by William John Fox, spring 1995 fellow, argues that Canada’s public broadcasting network has declined in quality after succumbing to commercial pressures to alter its programming in the 1980s. He details the network’s election coverage, demonstrating that serious…

Implementation of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the American Press: Objectives, Obstacles, and Incentives

Racial and ethnic diversity in the American press is a long standing concern. This Shorenstein Center report concludes that while much research has been done and the objectives are clear, there are numerous obstacles to implementation. Under-representation of minorities is…

Post-Communist Eastern Europe: The Difficult Birth of a Free Press

A paper by Bernard Margueritte, fall 1993 fellow, surveys the state of the press in Eastern Europe after the fall of the Iron Curtain. With weak training and standards, intense competition, and an invasion of Western investors, managers and press…

The Nigerian Press Under the Military: Persecution, Resilience and Political Crisis (1983–1993)

A paper by Adeyinka Adeyemi, fall 1993  fellow, analyzes Nigeria’s media landscape and finds that despite outward signs of a modern and vibrant press/government relationship, the country’s press is still not truly free. Adeyemi traces the oscillation between subtle and…

Paint-By-Numbers Journalism: How Reader Surveys and Focus Groups Subvert a Democratic Press

A paper by Alison Carper, spring 1994 fellow, responds to the increasing use of reader surveys and focus groups in journalism. She argues that this approach brings with it the risks of majoritarianism. Carper asks whether a press that takes…

Hispanic Voices: Is the Press Listening?

A paper by Jorge Quiroga, fall 1993 fellow, examines press coverage of the Hispanic community in the United States. Quiroga argues that the press serves as a gatekeeper, denying members of the Hispanic community full membership in the American political…

The Future of Global Television News

A paper by Richard Parker, spring 1993 fellow, explores the potential opportunities and challenges for a new era of “global television.” After seeing TV coverage of Tiananmen Square and the Gulf War broadcast live around the world, it’s hard to…

Ownership of Newspapers: The View from Positivist Social Science

A paper by C. Edwin Baker, fall 1992 fellow, analyzes the claim that concentration in media ownership has mostly objectionable effects on the media produced. Baker finds numerous flaws in the methodology of the research published on this topic, and…

TV Violence, Children and the Press: Eight Rationales Inhibiting Public Policy Debates

A paper by Sissela Bok, spring 1993 fellow, applies the perspective of philosopher and social critic to analyze public policy debates in the press about violent television. Bok exposes the weaknesses of eight common arguments: 1. America has always been…

Two Commanders-in-Chief: Free Expression’s Most Severe Test

A paper by Betty Houchin Winfield, spring 1991 fellow, examines free speech and press freedom in the U.S. during wartime. If wartime governments are more autocratic, writes Winfield, then it is assumed that presidents will take a more authoritative stance…