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Media & Politics Must Reads, July 15, 2016

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July 14, 2016, 4:24 pm

Our weekly roundup of news found at the intersection of media, politics, policy and technology, from the Shorenstein Center and from around the web.

This Week at the Shorenstein Center

News Coverage of the 2016 Presidential Primaries: Horse Race Reporting Has Consequences. A new report from Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy analyzes news coverage of the 2016 presidential primary races and how it affected the candidates’ chances of winning the nomination, concluding that coverage of the primaries focused on the horse race over the issues – to the detriment of candidates and voters alike. Read the report.

News from Our Fellows

The Debates Gave Donald Trump the Nomination, and It’s the Media’s Fault. Dan Kennedy, spring 2016 fellow and associate professor of journalism at Northeastern University, criticizes the Republican debates as “an exercise in faux democracy,” owing to their organization and presentation of the candidates.

How IBT’s Reporting Is Driving a Controversy over a Major Healthcare Merger in Connecticut. Trudy Lieberman, spring 2001 fellow and press critic for Columbia Journalism Review, writes about how the International Business Times uncovered a conflict of interest in the state’s review of a proposed merger of Anthem and Cigna.

Another Inconvenient Truth: It’s Hard to Agree How to Fight Climate Change. Matthew Nisbet, fall 2012 fellow and professor of communication at Northeastern University was interviewed by The New York Times about internal conflicts within the climate change movement that are complicating what it means to be an environmentalist.

From around the Web

Is Facebook Ready for Live Video’s Important Role in Police Accountability? From The Washington Post.

“Citizen Journalists” Have Become Powerful Allies in the Fight to Afflict the Comfortable, from Poynter.

Witnessing, Activism, Journalism — and the Boundaries of Free Speech in the Facebook Age, from Dan Gillmor.

Live-Streaming U.S. Shootings: Reminder of Dangers to “Objective Journalism,” from BBC Academy.

Most Americans Already Feel Election Coverage Fatigue, from Pew Research.

Facebook Plans Live Video Push During Conventions, from Politico.

CBS, Twitter Announce Partnership for Convention, from Associated Press.

News Outlets Prepare for Possible Unrest at Political Conventions, from The Huffington Post.

3 Ways Public Media are Collaborating on Election Coverage in California, from MediaShift.

How The Washington Post Is Using Genius to Explain the Twists and Turns of a Crazy Election, from Poynter.

How The Atlantic Is Bringing Its “Real-Time Magazine” Approach to Political Coverage, from Poynter.

A Reporter’s Arrest Is Just the Latest Reason to Worry about Press Freedom in Missouri, from Columbia Journalism Review.

What Brexit Trends Tell Us about How People Read the News, from Chartbeat.

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