War, Defense & Security

The War on Terrorism Goes Online: Media and Government Response to First Post-Internet Crisis

A paper by Andrew J. Glass, fall 2001 fellow, investigates the multifaceted role that the Internet played in the initial phases of the campaign against global terrorist networks. While the parameters of today’s online communications’ systems were in place during…

Speechwriting, Speechmaking, and the Press: The Kennedy Administration and the Bay of Pigs

A paper by Thomas W. Benson, spring 1999 fellow, follows the construction of presidential leadership through public rhetoric, including the authorship of that rhetoric, and its mediation through the press. As a master example, Benson analyzes the case of John…

Who Were the Saigon Correspondents and Does It Matter?

A paper by William M. Hammond, spring 1999 fellow, investigates the mystery of the Saigon correspondents. Opinions about who the correspondents were have been varied, and often colored by an individual’s view of the Vietnam War. A high percentage of…

Portraying American Public Opinion toward the Bosnia Crisis (abstract)

Richard Sobel, fall 1996 fellow, compares the disparity between public support for intervention in Bosnia as expressed in polls, and the limited reporting of those opinions in U.S. media and political discussions. Sobel hypothesizes that the press did not fully…

Ijambo: Speaking Truth amidst Genocide

Alexis Sinduhije, fall 1997 fellow, writes about the harrowing experience of practicing journalism in central Africa during the Rwandan Genocide. From 1993 to 1997, Sinduhije covered the violence around him, searching for ways that journalism could help stem the bloodshed,…

The Spokesperson — In the Crossfire: A Decade of Israeli Defense Crises from an Official Spokesperson’s Perspective

A paper by Nachman Shai, fall 1996 fellow, builds a case for the proposition that “truth” rather than “spin” is the basis of effective public information efforts, even when a nation is at war. Shai focuses on the turbulent decade…

Prepared for War, Ready for Peace?: Paramilitaries, Politics, and the Press in Northern Ireland

A paper by Tim Cooke, spring 1998 fellow, examines the role of the news media in societies affected by violent conflict, in particular, Northern Ireland. As paramilitary groups responsible for 30 years of headlines moved into the political arena and…

Spreading the Word: The KGB’s Image-Building Under Gorbachev

A paper by Jeff Trimble, fall 1991 fellow, analyzes how the Russian KGB dramatically transformed its image over time. The KGB, under different sets of initials, evoked frightening memories of the Soviet period of Russian history. Millions were herded into…

Clarifying the CNN Effect: An Examination of Media Effects According to Type of Military Intervention

A paper by Steven Livingston, spring 1996 fellow, examines the “CNN effect,” or the concept that global, real-time media affects the conduct of U.S. diplomacy and foreign policy. Livingston first seeks to clarify what exactly is meant by the CNN…

Shoah in the News: Patterns and Meanings of News Coverage of the Holocaust

A paper by James Carroll, spring 1997 fellow, examines press coverage of the Holocaust between l995-1997. More than 600 stories appeared in The New York Times in this brief period, about one a day. Thousands of others have appeared in…