Politics & Government Research

State Results of May Survey Show 60% of Americans Support Expanding Vote by Mail

May 28, 2020, 12:28 pm

The second round of a multi-university project to survey people in all 50 states about their opinions on the COVID-19 pandemic response focused on public opinion around increasing access to vote by mail (VBM) for the upcoming Presidential elections. 60%…

Understanding Misinformation on Mobile Instant Messengers (MIMs) in Developing Countries

May 27, 2020, 2:58 pm
Irene V. Pasquetto, Shorenstein Center, Harvard Kennedy School; Eaman Jahani, MIT Institute for Data, Systems and Society; Alla Baranovsky, Harvard Department of Government; and Matthew A. Baum, Shorenstein Center, Harvard Kennedy School

This mixed-methods research project in Nigeria, India, and Pakistan consisted of surveys, survey experiments, and semi-structured interviews, designed to better understand the spread and impact of misinformation, and in particular of misinformation on mobile messaging apps (MIMs).

New Round of COVID-19 Survey Shows Continued High Support for Policies, Increasing Partisan Divides

May 22, 2020, 3:03 pm

The second round of the multi-university project to survey public opinion on COVID-19 response measures in all 50 states was released today. It shows continued high rates of support for state government responses to the crisis, as well as for…

New survey shows U.S. public is ‘firmly opposed’ to reopening the economy immediately

April 30, 2020, 8:22 am
David Lazer (Northeastern), Matthew Baum (Harvard Kennedy School), Katherine Ognyanova (Rutgers University), John Della Volpe (Harvard Kennedy School)

A new national survey conducted by researchers from Harvard Kennedy School, Northeastern University, and Rutgers University shows broad support for COVID-19 response measures, and trust in expertise during the pandemic.

The Right Way to Regulate Digital Platforms

September 18, 2019, 4:16 pm
Gene Kimmelman, Senior Fellow, Digital Platforms and Democracy Project

This Policy Paper is part of the Digital Platforms & Democracy Project’s efforts to explain and disseminate ideas about regulation of major technology and digital platform companies. Click here to read more of their research and commentary. The views expressed…

Big Tech and Democracy: The Critical Role of Congress

April 23, 2019, 11:24 am

In March 2019, two projects at Harvard Kennedy School—the Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project at the Belfer Center and the Platform Accountability Project at the Shorenstein Center—hosted a workshop for Congressional staff to identify and discuss policy approaches to the dilemmas of big tech platforms.

Assessing Campaign Quality: Was the 2016 Presidential Campaign a Travesty?

April 18, 2019, 3:00 pm

By Roderick P. Hart, Fall 2018 Shorenstein Fellow and Shivers Chair in Communication and Professor of Government, University of Texas at Austin This essay is forthcoming as part of a special symposium on Campaign 2016 to be published in the…

Platform Accountability: An Interim Measure

April 15, 2019, 10:02 am
Philip Verveer, Shorenstein Center Research Fellow

Download the PDF of this paper here. Introduction The major digital platform companies present a large, complicated array of benefits and problems for the country and the world. The companies increasingly have the attention of both average citizens and senior-most…

Can Cities Save the Census? A Local Framework for Our Nation’s First Digital Count

April 1, 2019, 9:41 am

With trust in federal government and institutions at historic lows, local governments, including cities and counties, must play a critical role in the 2020 Census. If we don’t get the census right, there is so much we are at risk of getting wrong – the implications of which will last for years.

Estimating the Effect of Asking About Citizenship on the U.S. Census

March 21, 2019, 1:21 pm

The 2020 U.S. Census will, for the first time since 1950, ask about residents’ citizenship status. The effect of doing so on census completion across different racial/ethnic groups is, however, unknown. Leveraging a survey experiment, we are the first to assess the causal effect of this question change.