Post-Communist Eastern Europe: The Difficult Birth of a Free Press

A paper by Bernard Margueritte, fall 1993 fellow, surveys the state of the press in Eastern Europe after the fall of the Iron Curtain. With weak training and standards, intense competition, and an invasion of Western investors, managers and press…

The Nigerian Press Under the Military: Persecution, Resilience and Political Crisis (1983–1993)

A paper by Adeyinka Adeyemi, fall 1993  fellow, analyzes Nigeria’s media landscape and finds that despite outward signs of a modern and vibrant press/government relationship, the country’s press is still not truly free. Adeyemi traces the oscillation between subtle and…

Hispanic Voices: Is the Press Listening?

A paper by Jorge Quiroga, fall 1993 fellow, examines press coverage of the Hispanic community in the United States. Quiroga argues that the press serves as a gatekeeper, denying members of the Hispanic community full membership in the American political…

The Future of Global Television News

A paper by Richard Parker, spring 1993 fellow, explores the potential opportunities and challenges for a new era of “global television.” After seeing TV coverage of Tiananmen Square and the Gulf War broadcast live around the world, it’s hard to…

From Bhopal to Superfund: The News Media and the Environment

A paper by Sanjoy Hazarika, fall 1993 fellow, analyzes the press coverage of India’s Bhopal disaster in 1984. Hazarika was one of the first reporters to cover the industrial accident, a gas leak from a pesticide plant that killed more…

Transmitting Race: The Los Angeles Riot in Television News

A paper by Erna Smith, fall 1992 fellow, examines framing in the TV news coverage of the 1992 Los Angeles riot. Smith analyzes the content of television broadcasts before, during and after the riot on ten television stations, and draws…

TV Violence, Children and the Press: Eight Rationales Inhibiting Public Policy Debates

A paper by Sissela Bok, spring 1993 fellow, applies the perspective of philosopher and social critic to analyze public policy debates in the press about violent television. Bok exposes the weaknesses of eight common arguments: 1. America has always been…

Real-Time Television Coverage of Armed Conflicts and Diplomatic Crises: Does It Pressure or Distort Foreign Policy Decisions?

A paper by Nik Gowing, spring 1994 fellow, challenges the idea that real-time television coverage of armed conflicts impact foreign policy decisions. Conventional wisdom is that real-time television coverage creates a demand that “something must be done” and drives the…

Shadowboxing with Stereotypes: The Press, The Public, and the Candidates’ Wives

A paper by Karlyn Kohrs Campbell, fall 1992 fellow, analyzes media coverage of the presidential and vice presidential candidates’ wives during the 1992 election. Campbell examines some of the major influences on coverage of Barbara Bush, Hillary Clinton, Tipper Gore,…

The Role of the News Media in Unequal Political Conflicts: From the Intifada to the Gulf War and Back Again

A paper by Gadi Wolfsfeld, fall 1992 fellow, develops and applies a theoretical model to analyze the role of the news media in political conflicts, particularly unequal conflicts in the Middle East. Under what conditions are the news media most…