Clarifying the CNN Effect: An Examination of Media Effects According to Type of Military Intervention

A paper by Steven Livingston, spring 1996 fellow, examines the “CNN effect,” or the concept that global, real-time media affects the conduct of U.S. diplomacy and foreign policy. Livingston first seeks to clarify what exactly is meant by the CNN…

Shoah in the News: Patterns and Meanings of News Coverage of the Holocaust

A paper by James Carroll, spring 1997 fellow, examines press coverage of the Holocaust between l995-1997. More than 600 stories appeared in The New York Times in this brief period, about one a day. Thousands of others have appeared in…

The Foreign News Flow in the Information Age

A paper by Claude Moisy, spring 1995 fellow, asks whether the Internet is likely to improve the flow of international news, make the public more aware of world problems and, consequently, contribute to their solution. To address these questions, Moisy…

Post-Communist Eastern Europe: The Difficult Birth of a Free Press

A paper by Bernard Margueritte, fall 1993 fellow, surveys the state of the press in Eastern Europe after the fall of the Iron Curtain. With weak training and standards, intense competition, and an invasion of Western investors, managers and press…

The Nigerian Press Under the Military: Persecution, Resilience and Political Crisis (1983–1993)

A paper by Adeyinka Adeyemi, fall 1993  fellow, analyzes Nigeria’s media landscape and finds that despite outward signs of a modern and vibrant press/government relationship, the country’s press is still not truly free. Adeyemi traces the oscillation between subtle and…

The Future of Global Television News

A paper by Richard Parker, spring 1993 fellow, explores the potential opportunities and challenges for a new era of “global television.” After seeing TV coverage of Tiananmen Square and the Gulf War broadcast live around the world, it’s hard to…

From Bhopal to Superfund: The News Media and the Environment

A paper by Sanjoy Hazarika, fall 1993 fellow, analyzes the press coverage of India’s Bhopal disaster in 1984. Hazarika was one of the first reporters to cover the industrial accident, a gas leak from a pesticide plant that killed more…

Real-Time Television Coverage of Armed Conflicts and Diplomatic Crises: Does It Pressure or Distort Foreign Policy Decisions?

A paper by Nik Gowing, spring 1994 fellow, challenges the idea that real-time television coverage of armed conflicts impact foreign policy decisions. Conventional wisdom is that real-time television coverage creates a demand that “something must be done” and drives the…

The Role of the News Media in Unequal Political Conflicts: From the Intifada to the Gulf War and Back Again

A paper by Gadi Wolfsfeld, fall 1992 fellow, develops and applies a theoretical model to analyze the role of the news media in political conflicts, particularly unequal conflicts in the Middle East. Under what conditions are the news media most…

When Policy Fails: How the Buck Was Passed When Kuwait Was Invaded

A paper by Bernard Roshco, spring 1992 fellow, analyzes the failures of the Bush administration’s policies toward Iraq prior to the invasion of Kuwait in 1990, and the failings of the press in reporting on them. Roshco explores numerous questions….