The Reporter’s Privilege, Then and Now

A paper by Stephen Bates, fall 1999 fellow, explores how prosecutors and journalists see the issue of press subpoenas. Bates first looks at how the issue has been framed and fought over the years. Next, he tracks a subpoena issued…

State into Public: The Failed Reform of State TV in East Central Europe

A paper by Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, spring 1999 fellow, examines Eastern European state television and its difficult or sometimes failed transition from ownership by the state to public and private models. Mungiu-Pippidi looks at television in the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary,…

The New York Times Rule on the Net or in the World “…without uncertainty, compromise and fear,” or Should the New York Times Rule Be Introduced in Hungary?

A paper by Peter Molnar, spring 2000 fellow, examines Hungary’s lack of press freedom and possible paths forward. Freedom of speech was less valued in Hungary’s fledgling democracy than it was before the fall of the Berlin Wall, argues Molnar….

Getting the Story in China: American Reporters Since 1972

A paper by Jonathan Mirsky, fall 1999 fellow, follows the history of modern American reporting on China. Beginning with the 1972 post-Nixon euphoria of American reporters, Mirsky traces the American press’ growing awareness of the controls imposed on them by…

Great Sound Makes No Noise — Creeping Freedoms in Chinese Press

A paper by Xiguang Li, spring 1999 fellow, argues that along with a free market economy, China has begun to embrace a new kind of journalism, even if it has not necessarily been a planned part of China’s reform. Although…

Press Coverage of Belarus, A Newly Independent Country in Transition

A paper by Katsiaryna Ivanova, fall 1998 fellow, compares media coverage of events in Belarus by the government, independent press, and international press, to attempt to find out how the three types of press interact and what effect this interaction…

Tensions of a Free Press: South Africa After Apartheid

A paper by Sean Jacobs, fall 1998 fellow, examines changes in South Africa’s news media in the 1990s. Television and radio, long dominated by the state, had a history of bias in favor of South Africa’s apartheid government. The first…

Ijambo: Speaking Truth amidst Genocide

Alexis Sinduhije, fall 1997 fellow, writes about the harrowing experience of practicing journalism in central Africa during the Rwandan Genocide. From 1993 to 1997, Sinduhije covered the violence around him, searching for ways that journalism could help stem the bloodshed,…

The Enemy Within: The Effect of “Private Censorship” on Press Freedom and How to Confront It: An Israeli Perspective

A paper by Moshe Negbi, fall 1997 fellow, explores the rise of “commercially-motivated censorship” in Israel’s media. Negbi argues that powerful private interests in Israel’s media companies have suppressed and distorted stories and opinions that were not to their liking,…

Pressing Concerns: Hong Kong’s Media in an Era of Transition

A paper by Stephen J. Hutcheon, fall 1997 fellow, traces the history of press freedom in Hong Kong under British rule up to the aftermath of China’s takeover in 1997. Hutcheon analyzes the forces that could erode the freedom of…