The Form of Reports on U.S. Newspaper Internet Sites

A paper by Kevin G. Barnhurst, fall 2001 fellow, argues that U.S. newspapers that publish electronic editions on the Internet do not appear to reinvent themselves online. Instead the Web versions reproduce the substance of their print editions in a…

The Content of Reports on U.S. Newspaper Internet Sites

A paper by Kevin G. Barnhurst, fall 2001 fellow, argues that moving newspaper content onto the Internet has not, in itself, changed what journalists write. In many ways, the who, what, when, where, why, and how of news stories continue…

Doing Well and Doing Good: How Soft News and Critical Journalism Are Shrinking the News Audience and Weakening Democracy – and What News Outlets Can Do About It

This report by Thomas Patterson, Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press at the Shorenstein Center, asks if the news media do well and also do good? Can they meet their need to attract audiences and also fulfill their responsibility…

The Decline, But Not Yet Total Fall, of Foreign News in the U.S. Media

A paper by Jonathan Randal, fall 1998 fellow, argues that the decline in international affairs news can be attributed to a combination of factors, including audience disinterest and changes in the media business. With an increasingly fragmented audience, Randal worries…

State into Public: The Failed Reform of State TV in East Central Europe

A paper by Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, spring 1999 fellow, examines Eastern European state television and its difficult or sometimes failed transition from ownership by the state to public and private models. Mungiu-Pippidi looks at television in the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary,…

Should American Journalism Make Us Americans?

A paper by Jim Sleeper, fall 1998 fellow, asks if by offering a bilingual product, newspapers are undermining a united sense of citizenship. The Miami Herald began producing a Spanish-language version of its paper to attract the growing population of…

Junk News: Can Public Broadcasters Buck the Tabloid Tendencies of Market-Driven Journalism? A Canadian Experience

A paper by William John Fox, spring 1995 fellow, argues that Canada’s public broadcasting network has declined in quality after succumbing to commercial pressures to alter its programming in the 1980s. He details the network’s election coverage, demonstrating that serious…

Implementation of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the American Press: Objectives, Obstacles, and Incentives

Racial and ethnic diversity in the American press is a long standing concern. This Shorenstein Center report concludes that while much research has been done and the objectives are clear, there are numerous obstacles to implementation. Under-representation of minorities is…

The Future of Global Television News

A paper by Richard Parker, spring 1993 fellow, explores the potential opportunities and challenges for a new era of “global television.” After seeing TV coverage of Tiananmen Square and the Gulf War broadcast live around the world, it’s hard to…

Ownership of Newspapers: The View from Positivist Social Science

A paper by C. Edwin Baker, fall 1992 fellow, analyzes the claim that concentration in media ownership has mostly objectionable effects on the media produced. Baker finds numerous flaws in the methodology of the research published on this topic, and…