The Rise of the New News: A Case Study of Two Root Causes of the Modern Scandal Coverage

A paper by Marvin Kalb, former Shorenstein Center director and veteran reporter, analyzes the press coverage in the first few weeks of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Kalb attempts to answer the question: what is wrong with American journalism? Why has…

The Business of Getting “The Get”: Nailing an Exclusive Interview in Prime Time

A paper by Connie Chung, spring 1997 fellow, provides an insider’s account of a driving force in modern television news: the celebrity interview. Securing such an interview is highly competitive. Chung shows the techniques and strategies journalists use, and the…

Implementation of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the American Press: Objectives, Obstacles, and Incentives

Racial and ethnic diversity in the American press is a long standing concern. This Shorenstein Center report concludes that while much research has been done and the objectives are clear, there are numerous obstacles to implementation. Under-representation of minorities is…

Paint-By-Numbers Journalism: How Reader Surveys and Focus Groups Subvert a Democratic Press

A paper by Alison Carper, spring 1994 fellow, responds to the increasing use of reader surveys and focus groups in journalism. She argues that this approach brings with it the risks of majoritarianism. Carper asks whether a press that takes…

Hispanic Voices: Is the Press Listening?

A paper by Jorge Quiroga, fall 1993 fellow, examines press coverage of the Hispanic community in the United States. Quiroga argues that the press serves as a gatekeeper, denying members of the Hispanic community full membership in the American political…

An Economic Theory of Learning from News

A paper by Marion Just, professor at Wellesley College; W. Russell Neuman, professor at University of Michigan; and  Ann Crigler, fall 1991 fellow, explores an economic approach to understanding how people select, pay attention to, and learn from news stories….

Turmoil at Tiananmen: A Study of U.S. Press Coverage of the Beijing Spring of 1989

This report by the Shorenstein Center explores the U.S. media coverage of the 1989 Beijing Spring. Although the U.S. was not directly involved in the events that took place, media coverage made Americans deeply involved in them. Among the “firsts”…

Campaign Lessons for ’92

This Shorenstein Center report examines media coverage of the 1988 presidential election and proposes recommendations for campaign coverage moving forward. In the aftermath of the 1988 election, Republicans wondered how the personal background of  vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle could,…

Changing Lanes on the Inside Track: The Career Shuttle Between Journalism, Politics and Government

A paper by James McEnteer, spring 1990 fellow, evaluates the phenomenon of the revolving door between journalism and politics or government. McEnteer challenges the idea that moving from government roles to journalism is always a conflict of interest. Journalists should…

Nine Sundays: A Proposal for Better Presidential Campaign Coverage

This Shorenstein Center report by John Ellis provides recommendations for improving election coverage during the nine Sundays between Labor Day and Election Day, when public interest in the presidential campaign increases. This proposal recommends that major broadcast networks provide 90…