Day: January 1, 2005

Death in Wartime: Photographs and the “Other War” in Afghanistan

A paper by Barbie Zelizer, spring 2004 fellow, addresses the formulaic dependence of the news media on images of people facing impending death. Considering one example of this depiction – U.S. journalism’s photographic coverage of the killing of the Taliban by the Northern Alliance during the war on Afghanistan – the paper traces its strategic …

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Measuring Media Diversity: Problems and Prospects

A paper by Richard Schultz, spring 2005 fellow, analyzes the debate surrounding the FCC’s Diversity Index and explores the question of how to best measure media diversity. Given the centrality of media diversity as a longstanding policy goal of the FCC, the question of what constitutes diversity must be at the heart of any attempt …

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The Reporters

Alex Sanders, fall 2004 fellow, writes about his run for the Senate, as a Democratic nominee from South Carolina to succeed J. Strom Thurmond, and recounts his experience – mostly positive – with handling the press. The paper also draws some larger conclusions about the relationship of reporters and politicians, and the implications for democracy. …

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“All Successful Democracies Need Freedom of Speech”: American Efforts to Create a Vibrant Free Press in Iraq and Afghanistan

A paper by David Rohde, spring 2005 fellow, examines American efforts to create a vibrant free press in Iraq and Afghanistan. A $200 million project in Iraq was the largest attempt ever by the United States, or any country, to help create independent media in another nation. Run by the Pentagon, it was a near …

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Orwell Meets Nixon: When and Why “The Press” Became “The Media”

A paper by Martin F. Nolan, fall 2004 fellow, explores President Nixon’s antagonistic relationship with the press. He argues that Nixon sought to disarm his critics by changing “the press,” a Constitutionally protected form of expression, into “the media,” a pejorative – and succeeded. Download the paper (PDF).

Setting the Agenda: The New York Times’ Jayson Blair Report and its Impact on American Media

A paper by Seth Mnookin, spring 2004 fellow, examines the making and results of The New York Times’ Jayson Blair Report. The report helped demonstrate The New York Times’ power to shape the national news agenda, argues Mnookin, and in doing so, helped codify the way in which newspapers were expected to respond to accusations …

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Are America and “Old Europe” Reconciled after the War in Iraq, and Does It Matter? An Examination of U.S. and European Reporting of the Outcome of the Presidential Election

A paper by Jacqueline Jones, fall 2004 fellow, examines whether the reelection of President George W. Bush left the alliance between the U.S. and Europe stronger or shattered. There was a huge appetite in European newspapers for stories on the U.S. election, with the European press heavily favoring Kerry – and the significance of the …

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